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Jason Joyce
 
May 9, 2013 | Gear Guide, Stuff, Winemaking | Jason Joyce

A Winemaker's Guide To Pants

    Winemaking can really be tough on clothes, especially pants, so finding good work clothes has been more of a challenge than I ever expected.  The mix of vineyard and cellar work, hot dry conditions followed by wet and cold on a never ending cycle really tests garment quality. My first few months working I just assumed that a pair of random denim jeans is all I’d ever need.  I learned quickly that cheap blue jeans, those on the Ross clearance rack, are not really up to the task.  Blown out seams and fabric rips give them a working life of maybe a month or so.  By my second harvest I had moved on to the ranch classics, Levis 501s and Wrangler 13 WMZs.   While these were a definite step in the right direction, they still only gave me a shelf life of a couple months before some type of integrity fail reared its ugly head. 

     I eventually decided to trial some of the tougher work wear classics like Dickies, Carhartt and Ben Davis.  The Dickies performed much like the hardier jeans, falling apart after a promising start.  During testing, the Ben Davis held up great, lasting a whole harvest of wearing 4-5 times a week.  But the fit wasn’t the most comfortable.  They are a bit baggy which can lead to snagging on things like drip lines, barrel racks, and tank valves, no good!  Carhartt became my go to work pants during the 2009-2011 harvests.  Overall, they gave the best performance and comfort at work.  Plus Carhartt was based in my hometown of Detroit, well Dearborn is kind of Detroit.  I thought I'd never have to think about work pants again.
    Sadly, something changed.  The Made in USA tag on Carhartts disappeared and was replaced with Made in China or Mexico.  Call me crazy, but the crotch seams started failing after a few months.  I started to get fabric tears and the fit was not what it used to be.  Then I started to notice that not a single pair of work pants I had been trying were made in America.  This got me thinking, does anyone make sturdy work clothes in this country anymore?  A little research led me to discovering probably the world’s best pair pants.  The Filson Oil Finish Double Tin Pants have no equal.  When the first 2 customer reviews I read were 5 stars from a logger talking about the pants handling a whip from a broken chain saw and a Canadian Railway engineer who’s had a single pair for 8 years, I knew I had moved in the right direction.  They are not as cheap as other pants I'd tried, but not crazy expensive for quality clothing.  I mean, they are cheaper than most women's denim pants these days!  Plus, I don’t think it is physically possible to damage these things.  Everyone should own a pair of Double Tine Cloth pants, just to feel the sensation of what a truly well crafted piece of work clothing feels like.  It was like the time I was shopping for my wedding suit and my friend took me to a shop in San Francisco that only sold hand-made Italians.  Everything else just plain feels wrong and cheap once you wear the real deal. 
     The only problem with the Big Boy Filson’s is that they are a bit too heavy duty.    In August, when it’s 112 degrees in the vineyard, they can get a bit sweaty walking around.  Plus, the oil finish has a strict no washing allowed rule.  Things can get a bit funky!  So in searching for something a bit more daily practical, I came across my current favorite work pants, Earl’s Gung Ho Camp Trouser.  These are darn near a perfect pair of work pants.  Sturdy 12oz duck cloth, button fly, a unique cut, made in Texas, affordable…etc.  I think, after all these years, I’ve found my daily work pants.  Sadly there are rumors that Earl's may be going out of business, so stock up while you can.  But of course, the experiment never ends.  I have pair of these coming in for testing during this year’s harvest.  And I’m always open to suggestions, so if you have a pair of pants you think can handle the work, I’m all ears.

Comments

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@ May 12, 2013 at 6:05 PM
http://www.nationalfirefighter.com/product_info.php?cPath=6_299_325&products_id=5398

The Dragonslayer. Ought to be able to handle that PR heat better than those Filsons.

John Smith's Gravatar
 
John Smith
@ Feb 15, 2015 at 11:27 PM
Packers and Movers Mumbai @ http://6th.in/packers-and-movers-mumbai/

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